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Do Practice Characteristics Influence Online Ratings of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons?

Published:November 05, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2021.10.019
      Online physician rating websites have emerged as a popular, but controversial, means of evaluating the quality of health care services. Prior research found that online ratings, albeit consistent across various rating websites per provider, were not predictive of typical measures of clinical quality, including specialty-specific performance scores such as hospital length of stay and 30-day readmissions. However, the generalizability of this work was limited by a small sample size.
      • Daskivich T.J.
      • Houman J.
      • Fuller G.
      • et al.
      Online physician ratings fail to predict actual performance on measures of quality, value, and peer review.
      Subsequent research has sought to find correlations between practice characteristics and patient ratings by grouping physicians by hospital system,
      • Okike K.
      • Uhr N.R.
      • Shin S.Y.M.
      • et al.
      A comparison of online physician ratings and Internal patient-Submitted ratings from a Large Healthcare system.
      specialty,
      • Murphy G.P.
      • Awad M.A.
      • Tresh A.
      • et al.
      Association of patient volume with online ratings of California urologists.
      or rating website
      • Zhao H.H.
      • Luu M.
      • Spiegel B.
      • Daskivich T.J.
      Correlation of online physician rating Subscores and Association with Overall satisfaction: Observational study of 212,933 providers.
      ; however, there is a deficiency in the literature analyzing how practice characteristics of oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) influence online ratings. To investigate this relationship, we evaluated Medicare utilization data and online ratings of OMSs. We hypothesized that practice-specific factors, such as high patient volume, would correlate with lower patient reviews. Furthermore, we assessed whether consistency in ratings across multiple websites holds true for OMSs.
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